April 18, 2012
quantumaniac:

Electrons
To round out the basic atomic particles, the electron is a subatomic particle with a unitary negative electric charge, equal to the charge of a proton but with an opposite sign. Electrons are fermions due to their half-integer spin, as well as leptons, and have an extremely small mass - approximately 1/1836 that of the proton. Since an electron is a fermion, no two electrons can occupy the same quantum state - in accordance with the Pauli Exclusion Principle.
The antiparticle of the electron is called the positron. As with any particle-antiparticle pair, when the two collide they annihilate each other and produce gamma ray photons. Electrons participate in the gravitational, electromagnetic and weak nuclear forces. The weird principle of wave-particle duality in quantum mechanics can be best demonstrated through experiments using electrons. 
The concept of an indivisible quantity of electric charge was theorized in 1838 by British natural philosopher Richard Laming. The electron was introduced in 1894 by physicist George Johnstone Stoney, and was first identified as a particle three years later 1897 by J.J. Thomson and his team of physicists. 
Electrons, together with atomic nuclei made of protons and neutrons, make up atoms. However, electrons contribute less than 0.06% of an atom’s total mass. The attraction between the opposite charges of the proton and electron due to the Compton effect is what holds atoms together. 
P.S: Do you like the picture? Get awesome plush particles from the Particle Zoo! 

Hoorah for fermions! Does this mean since the electron fits in my hand, a plush proton should be the size of a king-sized mattress or so? 

quantumaniac:

Electrons

To round out the basic atomic particles, the electron is a subatomic particle with a unitary negative electric charge, equal to the charge of a proton but with an opposite sign. Electrons are fermions due to their half-integer spin, as well as leptons, and have an extremely small mass - approximately 1/1836 that of the proton. Since an electron is a fermion, no two electrons can occupy the same quantum state - in accordance with the Pauli Exclusion Principle.

The antiparticle of the electron is called the positron. As with any particle-antiparticle pair, when the two collide they annihilate each other and produce gamma ray photons. Electrons participate in the gravitational, electromagnetic and weak nuclear forces. The weird principle of wave-particle duality in quantum mechanics can be best demonstrated through experiments using electrons. 

The concept of an indivisible quantity of electric charge was theorized in 1838 by British natural philosopher Richard Laming. The electron was introduced in 1894 by physicist George Johnstone Stoney, and was first identified as a particle three years later 1897 by J.J. Thomson and his team of physicists. 

Electrons, together with atomic nuclei made of protons and neutrons, make up atoms. However, electrons contribute less than 0.06% of an atom’s total mass. The attraction between the opposite charges of the proton and electron due to the Compton effect is what holds atoms together. 

P.S: Do you like the picture? Get awesome plush particles from the Particle Zoo

Hoorah for fermions! Does this mean since the electron fits in my hand, a plush proton should be the size of a king-sized mattress or so? 

April 17, 2012
…and a Laplacian for ya’.

…and a Laplacian for ya’.

April 17, 2012
Started Portal 2 and I found Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle. Hah. Oh, Vaaaaalve.

Started Portal 2 and I found Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle. Hah. Oh, Vaaaaalve.

March 18, 2012
metaconscious:

Neutrinos send wireless message through the Earth
Just as neutrinos look likely to lose their faster-than-light crown, these subatomic particles have a new claim to fame as part of a wireless communication system that could potentially send messages directly through the Earth’s core.
A team at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois have successfully used a beam of the near-massless particles to transmit the word “neutrino” to a detector 1 km away, including a 240-metre journey through solid rock.
Neutrinos rarely interact with other forms of matter, so pass through most objects unimpeded - including the Earth’s core. That makes them potentially useful as messengers. Previous suggestions include using these ghostly particles to send messages across the planet without wires, cables or satellites, to communicate with hidden submarines or even to sync alien clocks. This latest experiment is the first demonstration that the principle actually works…
(via New Scientist)

Does anyone else think, perhaps, the changing magnetic field of the earth’s outer core might interfere with passing neutrinos?
I’m rather new to quantum theory, but don’t neutrinos have a magnetic moment of their own?
If it works, however, that would be fucking badass.

metaconscious:

Neutrinos send wireless message through the Earth

Just as neutrinos look likely to lose their faster-than-light crown, these subatomic particles have a new claim to fame as part of a wireless communication system that could potentially send messages directly through the Earth’s core.

A team at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois have successfully used a beam of the near-massless particles to transmit the word “neutrino” to a detector 1 km away, including a 240-metre journey through solid rock.

Neutrinos rarely interact with other forms of matter, so pass through most objects unimpeded - including the Earth’s core. That makes them potentially useful as messengers. Previous suggestions include using these ghostly particles to send messages across the planet without wires, cables or satellites, to communicate with hidden submarines or even to sync alien clocks. This latest experiment is the first demonstration that the principle actually works…

(via New Scientist)

Does anyone else think, perhaps, the changing magnetic field of the earth’s outer core might interfere with passing neutrinos?

I’m rather new to quantum theory, but don’t neutrinos have a magnetic moment of their own?

If it works, however, that would be fucking badass.

(Source: metaconscious)

February 29, 2012

A wonderful lead-up to the Quantum Mechanical Beast that underlies everything in this fine universe.

Especially nice is the way he explains the purpose of the complex conjugate when calculating the probability of finding an electron: (Ψ)(Ψ*) [used parenthesis to show Ψ and Ψ* are two different terms multiplied together and to differentiate the complex conjugate symbol “*” from its more common use as a multiplicative symbol]