July 22, 2014

(Source: dboybaker, via zagreus-taking-time-apart)

July 22, 2014

jtotheizzoe:

Behold: The Beauty of Solar Magnetism

NEW VIDEO! As massive magnetic fusion reactors go, the sun is pretty awesome. This week’s video features all the violence and beauty that erupt from that big bright thing at the center of our solar system.

We’ve got sunspots, coronal loops, solar flares, coronal mass ejections! Even an aurora or two!

And thanks to the fine people of NASA and their fancy satellites, this one is dripping with #spaceporn. Watch below:

(via pbsdigitalstudios)

(via shychemist)

July 21, 2014

physicswithbalzer:

rissawesome:

agender-ara:

flagitiousbunny:

WHAT ARE BIRDS

Hello yes! A Science Birb, here to explain the science!

Birb have VERY LARGE EYE in skull. Very good for seeing! But not space for muscle, birb cannot move eye. For mammal to make steady image, keep focus on single thing, always moving eye! Tiny movements, sometimes not even know. But birb cannot make tiny movements! So, birb must move whole head. And that is why the birb can keep steady the head when the body is amovering!

Thank you for listening to a science

I’m crying

That was the greatest scientific explanation I have ever read

Incredible.

(Source: talk-birdy-to-me, via psychotic-science)

July 21, 2014
afro-dominicano:

World’s Biggest Laser Blasts Diamond to Simulate Planet Cores


  The biggest laser in the world was used to crush a diamond, offering insights into how the hardest known material behaves when it is exposed to extremely high pressures. The experiment could also reveal new clues about what happens at the cores of giant planets, where conditions of intense atmospheric pressures exist.
  
  Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, led by physicist Raymond Smith, blasted a sliver of diamond with a laser beam at a pressure of 725 million pounds per square inch (51 million kilograms per square centimeter). This is the kind of pressure found near the core of giant planets, such as Jupiter or huge, rocky bodies known as “super-Earths.”
  
  The entire experiment took only 25 billionths of a second. The researchers fired 176 laser beams at a small cylinder of gold, called a hohlraum, with a tiny chip of synthetic diamond embedded in it. When the laser beams hit the cylinder, the energy was converted to X-rays. The hohlraum was vaporized, and in the process, the diamond was exposed to pressures tens of millions of times Earth’s atmospheric pressure.
  
  Theoretical calculations predicted that such high pressures should cause a diamond to change its crystal structure. One way to test if this is true is to measure the speed of sound waves in a material. If this speed changes abruptly as the pressure goes up, then the diamond structure has rearranged itself.
  
  But that didn’t happen — the velocity of sound waves changed smoothly.
  
  "If there was a phase transformation you’d expect a discontinuity," Smith said.
  
  The rate of change in the diamond’s density also didn’t match up with earlier theoretical models. Materials typically become denser at high pressures, and diamond is no exception. But how fast its density changed was a surprise, the researchers said.
  
  The experiment was a breakthrough, in that instead of smacking the diamond with high pressure in a stepwise fashion, such as hitting it with successively heavier hammers, the researchers were able to boost the pressure smoothly. This enabled them to crush the diamond and expose it to intense pressure without the substance becoming too hot and melting. (Diamonds can and do melt at sufficiently high temperatures).
  
  Since diamonds are made of carbon, understanding how this material behaves at high pressures can be important in the study of planets around other stars, said Nikku (Madhu) Madhusudhan, a professor of astrophysics at the University of Cambridge.

afro-dominicano:

World’s Biggest Laser Blasts Diamond to Simulate Planet Cores

The biggest laser in the world was used to crush a diamond, offering insights into how the hardest known material behaves when it is exposed to extremely high pressures. The experiment could also reveal new clues about what happens at the cores of giant planets, where conditions of intense atmospheric pressures exist.

Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, led by physicist Raymond Smith, blasted a sliver of diamond with a laser beam at a pressure of 725 million pounds per square inch (51 million kilograms per square centimeter). This is the kind of pressure found near the core of giant planets, such as Jupiter or huge, rocky bodies known as “super-Earths.”

The entire experiment took only 25 billionths of a second. The researchers fired 176 laser beams at a small cylinder of gold, called a hohlraum, with a tiny chip of synthetic diamond embedded in it. When the laser beams hit the cylinder, the energy was converted to X-rays. The hohlraum was vaporized, and in the process, the diamond was exposed to pressures tens of millions of times Earth’s atmospheric pressure.

Theoretical calculations predicted that such high pressures should cause a diamond to change its crystal structure. One way to test if this is true is to measure the speed of sound waves in a material. If this speed changes abruptly as the pressure goes up, then the diamond structure has rearranged itself.

But that didn’t happen — the velocity of sound waves changed smoothly.

"If there was a phase transformation you’d expect a discontinuity," Smith said.

The rate of change in the diamond’s density also didn’t match up with earlier theoretical models. Materials typically become denser at high pressures, and diamond is no exception. But how fast its density changed was a surprise, the researchers said.

The experiment was a breakthrough, in that instead of smacking the diamond with high pressure in a stepwise fashion, such as hitting it with successively heavier hammers, the researchers were able to boost the pressure smoothly. This enabled them to crush the diamond and expose it to intense pressure without the substance becoming too hot and melting. (Diamonds can and do melt at sufficiently high temperatures).

Since diamonds are made of carbon, understanding how this material behaves at high pressures can be important in the study of planets around other stars, said Nikku (Madhu) Madhusudhan, a professor of astrophysics at the University of Cambridge.

(via scinerds)

July 21, 2014

zagreus-taking-time-apart:

me:

image

you:

image


 

July 21, 2014
asapscience:

via Bird and Moon Comics

asapscience:

via Bird and Moon Comics

(via shychemist)

July 21, 2014

shorm:

abaldwin360:

When confronted with a cuddly cat, the lizard simply continues to lizard.

I will never not reblog this.

(Source: ofelias, via cnuculator)

July 21, 2014
breakingnews:

Obama asks Russia to hold rebels accountable on MH17 crash site
AP: President Obama accused pro-Russian separatists on Monday of interfering with the MH17 crash site, in a speech at the White House.
"The burden now is on Russia to insist that separatists stop tampering with the crash site," Obama said.
Follow the latest at Breaking News. 
Photo: AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

breakingnews:

Obama asks Russia to hold rebels accountable on MH17 crash site

AP: President Obama accused pro-Russian separatists on Monday of interfering with the MH17 crash site, in a speech at the White House.

"The burden now is on Russia to insist that separatists stop tampering with the crash site," Obama said.

Follow the latest at Breaking News

Photo: AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

July 21, 2014

todaysdocument:

The Eagle Has Landed, The Flight of Apollo 11, 1969

Through television, motion picture and still photography, this film provides an “eye-witness” perspective of the Apollo 11 mission that put a human on the moon in July 1969.

Read about the moon landing and all the activity surrounding Apollo’s mission with an article from Prologue’s archives: http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2003/summer/20-july-1969.html

(Source: youtu.be, via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

July 21, 2014

inothernews:

party-wok:

tanya77:

salon:

Tennessee could be the Internet’s last hope.

Read this.

Now watch some rich redneck cock it up.

Who knew that hydroelectric power would one day sort of lead to faster Interwebz?